What is LAN?

The abbreviations LAN or WLAN are probably known by anyone – no matter if you have heard it at home or at work. In this article we want to explain you what exactly stands behind LAN and what Ethernet and WOL have to do with it.

Why do I need LAN?

The acronym LAN stands for Local Area Network and describes a computer network within a limited area. If you – for instance – connect one of our Mini-PCs with a network using a LAN cable, the PC can communicate with other devices to get access to the same server, use a printer or even an internet connection. You can also connect multiple Mini-PCs with one and the same router– it just means that they are using the same computer network.

The LAN or Ethernet cable RJ-45

To connect our Mini-PCs with the network, you simply need two things: The first one is the LAN interface on the PC itself and the second is a fitting LAN cable. Good news: All of our spo-comm Mini-PCs are equipped with at least one LAN interface.

The LAN cable, which is also called Ethernet cable, has a RJ plug connection. The RJ in this means Registered Jack and it stands for a standardized telecommunication network interface. This standard describes the construction of the sockets and plugs, as well as their contact assignment. The RJ-45 has an 8P8C assignment: This means that it has eight possible contact positions (P) and eight of them are in fact used (C). For this type there are cable in the categories 5/5e to 6e.

From LAN to Wireless LAN

For some of our spo-comm Mini-PCs you don’t necessarily need a LAN connection to connect it with other devices. A few of our PCs can be connected with devices by using the integrated or optional Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi which actually stands for Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) is just a connection within a computer network that doesn’t need any cables.

Wake on LAN – WOL

The short-term WOL stands for Wake on LAN and is a standard by AMD that makes it possible to start a switched-off computer with the integrated network card. The requirement the PC has to offer is that the network card is still powered even when the PC is turned off. This requirement, by the way, is fulfilled by every single one of our Mini-PCs.

LAN expansion cards

There are, as well, special LAN extension cards which are not onboard as standard. These cards are needed if you want to increase the amount of the PC’s LAN interfaces. This can be advantageous if one and the same Mini-PC has to access multiple networks or devices, such as IP based surveillance cameras, at once. For our Mini-PCs of the BRICK series and two of the RUGGED-PCs, the spo-book RUGGED Q170 and the spo-book RUGGED GTX 1050Ti, there is a special adapter plate. For our spo-book NOVA CUBE Q87 there is a PCI expansion card.

If you have any questions about LAN, WiFi or Wake on LAN on your spo-comm device, feel free to contact us by mail.

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30 Nov 2017 Array ( [id] => 300 [title] => The professional Mini-PC product series from spo-comm – network applications [authorId] => [active] => 1 [shortDescription] => In the past few weeks we have been introducing you our product series in more detail. Both our digital signage players and our Mini-PCs for the fields of industrial control and vehicle computing were introduced. This time we would like to discuss the application of mini computers in the area of networking. Our product range offers the spo-book TECH QUAD and the spo-book NINETEEN Q170. [description] =>

spo-book TECH QUAD

With the small dimensions of just 219 x 40 x 151 millimeters the spo-book TECH QUAD can be placed easily even when there’s not much space. This Mini-PC is passively cooled, its control lamps are on the front and the diverse connectors on the back which makes it perfect to install the PC into server racks. The TECH QUAD is compatible with a lot of operating systems and thereby offers numerous software solutions. An Intel Quad Core processor and up to 8GB RAM let this Mini-PC master very high requirements. The most important feature are the 4 GB network ports with each one Intel controller. Besides that the spo-book TECH QUAD has a bypass-function on two LAN ports which makes it possible to implement fault tolerant filters and loggers.

KeKey data:

  • 4 GB network port
  • Compatible with Windows 7 or 8, Windows Embedded and Linux
  • Size 219 x 40 x 151
  • Bypass-function on two LAN ports

##Explore spo-book NINETEEN Q170

 

spo-book NINETEEN Q170

The name of our spo-book NINETEEN Q170 comes from the possibility to install the PC into 19 inch racks using optional slide rails. The housing of the NINETEEN Q170 with the size 483 x 40 x 390 millimeters provides enough space to put a 16x PCIe expansion card and/ or an optical drive into it. Not just one 2,5” or two 3,5” hard drives, but also up to three SSDs can be installed in the NINETEEN Q170 and offer overall a storage of several terabytes (see also “What is the difference between HDD and SSD?”). Those who value security can also configure the storage media to use RAID (see also “What is RAID?”).

Key data:

  • Installing up to three SSDs with several terabyte storage
  • Optional RAID level for the hard disks
  • Fits into 19 inch racks using slide rails

##Explore spo-book NINETEEN Q170

 

Any questions left? Feel free to contact our team, we will be happy to answer your questions and make the right choice!

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products
The professional Mini-PC product series from spo-comm – network applications
In the past few weeks we have been introducing you our product series in more detail. Both our digital signage players and our Mini-PCs for the fields of industrial control and vehicle computing were introduced. This time we would like to discuss the application of mini computers in the area of networking. Our product range offers the spo-book TECH QUAD and the spo-book NINETEEN Q170.
27 Sep 2018 Array ( [id] => 346 [title] => What is USB? [authorId] => [active] => 1 [shortDescription] => Two weeks ago we initiated our new series about interfaces on our spo-comm blog with the “What is LAN?” article. Today we want to continue the series with the commonplace USB port. We use it to charge our phones or to connect a mouse or USB-stick with our computer. In this article we want to give you a glimpse of what stands behind the well-known USB and what the differences between the various specifications such as USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 Gen. 2 are. [description] =>

Universal Serial Bus – USB

The short term USB stands for Universal Serial Bus and a serial communication that was developed by a merger of some companies – NEC and Microsoft for instance – to connect peripheral devices with a PC. A computer with a USB port, but also USB sticks can be connected at any time during system operation. In this process called Hot Swapping the external device and its features are automatically recognized.

From USB 1.0 to USB 3.1 SuperSpeed – The development of the interface

1996 was the year the first specification USB 1.0 with a data rate of 12 Mbit/s was released. With the introduction of USB 2.0 in 2000 even hard disks and video devices could be connected – thanks to the data rate of 480 Mbit/s.

Ten years ago the specifications of USB 3.0 SuperSpeed – also called USB 3.1 Gen 1 – with a data rate of 5 Gbit/s were presented. At the same time new cables and connectors were introduced. 2013 USB 3.1 – called USB 3.1 Gen 2 – was finalized and doubled up the speed of the predecessor to 10 Gbit/s. The latest specification USB 3.2 was released in 2017 and comes with a data rate of up to 20 Gbit/s.

By the way: ll spo-comm Mini-PCs are equipped with at least one USB 3.0 port!

USB transmission technologies

Using a host controller which is regularly based on the mainboard, the communication of USB can be managed. Only this host can read a devices’ information or send data to the device. The device can only send information if the host sends a query.
There are four established standards, which the USB controller chips hold on to and which are different in their performance and the implementation of features:

  • Universal Host Controller Interface (UHCI): Specified in 1995 by Intel with a data rate from 1,5 to 12 Mbit/s.
  • Open Host Controller Interface (OHCI): Developed by a consortium of companies and just marginal faster than UHCI.
  • Enhanced Host Controller Interface (EHCI): Provides USB 2.0 features and is designed for Hi-Speed mode (480 Mbit/s). For transfer to a USB 1.0/1.1 device OHCI and UHCI has to be supported.
  • Extensible Host Controller Interface (xHCI) : xHCI was released by Intel, provides USB 3.1 features and supports the SuperSpeed mode with 4 Gbit/s – with USB 3.1 even 9,7 Gbit/s.

The different plug types of USB

The Universal Serial Bus knows various plugs and connectors that differ in their measurements, but also in the possible data transmission speed.
The latest one is the universal USB Type C port, which is installed in many smartphones because of its low height and width. With this port data rates of up to 10 Gbit/s are possible, because USB 3.1 Gen 2 is supported. The USBC interface is suitable for transferring audio and video data parallel to USB data and supports DisplayPort, PCIe and Thunderbolt.

##See all spo-comm Mini-PCs!

##Read the “What is LAN?” article

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know-how
What is USB?
Two weeks ago we initiated our new series about interfaces on our spo-comm blog with the “What is LAN?” article. Today we want to continue the series with the commonplace USB port. We use it to charge our phones or to connect a mouse or USB-stick with our computer. In this article we want to give you a glimpse of what stands behind the well-known USB and what the differences between the various specifications such as USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 Gen. 2 are.
23 Oct 2018 Array ( [id] => 350 [title] => What is SPDIF? [authorId] => [active] => 1 [shortDescription] => Today we are sharing an article, in which we want to tell you about the interface SPDIF. Although it is mostly used in the consumer electronics field, some of our Mini-PCs are equipped with this port. In this article you will find what defines SPDIF, what it is used for and how it does compared to HDMI. [description] =>

SPDIF – Digital audio transmission: All in one

The short-term SPDIF, also S/PDIF, stands for “Sony/ Philips Digital Interface”. Behind this serial interface are the companies Sony and Philips who created SPDIF as a specification for transferring digital stereo and audio signals. Special about this is that SPDIF is able to transfer either optically or also electrically. The port is mainly used for CD players, between DVD players and in home cinemas, because harness can be avoided by using SPDIF.

Plug connections for SPDIF

Just like every other interface, SPDIF has special connectors, too. Within these it is differed between electrical plugs and plugs for optical transmission. For the latter the TOSLINK plug is used. The electrical transmission counts on an RCA plug with coaxial cable, very rarely also a 3.5 mm phone connector.

HDMI or SPDIF – How to transfer audio

HDMI as well as SPDIF are digitally transferring data, where HDMI is only electrical, SPDIF can even be constructed optically. In contrast to HDMI SPDIF is much older and therefore has one main disadvantage: At the beginning SPDIF was only built for PCM, by now the enormous bandwidths, for instance with DTS, are too big to be transmitted with SPDIF. A downmix of the data would be possible but would bring significant loss of performance. This is not the case by using HDMI. Another advantage of HDMI is that one cable can be saved because it transfers video and audio data at the same time.

spo-comm Mini-PCs with SPDIF:

•    spo-book WINDBOX III Evo

##See all spo-comm Mini-PCs!

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know-how
What is SPDIF?
Today we are sharing an article, in which we want to tell you about the interface SPDIF. Although it is mostly used in the consumer electronics field, some of our Mini-PCs are equipped with this port. In this article you will find what defines SPDIF, what it is used for and how it does compared to HDMI.